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alanpeterka

Accessibility reference

I work in education, and one of the requirements for materials we create is that they are accessible to all learners. Where might I learn more about making Godot games (or perhaps games in general) accessible to users with vision or auditory impairments?

  • Nathan Lovato replied

    Currently, there aren't many resources available on the subject that are specific to Godot. One of the best general resources for game developers on accessibility are on the following website though: https://gameaccessibilityguidelines.com/

    Would you have a list of precise accessibility requirements for your students? On top of color blindness and limited vision, what do you need to have absolutely?

    We'd be eager to work on an open-source Godot add-on to cater to those needs. Especially now that Godot 4 provides much better support to add accessibility features.

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    alanpeterka replied

    We generally use the WCAG 2.0 AA standards for web-based content. https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/ but I’m not sure this entirely covers the nature of a 3d environment or even a side scroller. 

    it’s interesting and encouraging to hear that 4.0 will allow for better support in this area. Thanks for the link too - I’ll check it out.

  • Nathan Lovato replied

    Thanks. The web page accessibility standards don't cover games, not even 2D ones, unfortunately.

    Would you have a short-list of the impairments or disabilities you must absolutely account for?

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    alanpeterka replied

    I don't really have anything like a list. I've reached out to our accommodations office to get their thoughts. I'm personally wondering most about vision impairments. Like how would I make sure that any text added to the game could be read aloud? And images or the the game board itself would be described? Would I need to add my own audio files to the game, or would there be something akin to screen readers for games?

    Another general question, would the planned final export make any difference? Like would considerations change if the final export was for HTML5 vs Windows vs iOS?

  • Nathan Lovato replied

    Godot does give you access to accessibility features from the system the game is running on, such as text-to-speech. So yes, you can leverage the text-to-speech engine that comes with the users' devices since Godot 3.5, and you don't need your own audio files.

    The export platform shouldn't make any difference other than the users needing to have accessibility features turned on on their system (or give the app permission perhaps in the web browser), but there should be nothing specific to Godot there.